Welcome to FNTG

Welcome to the Friends of Northampton (MA) Trails and Greenways, a community-based 501(c)(3) non-profit organization devoted to improving the expanding rail-trail network in Northampton,
Massachusetts.

E-mail us: fntg@fntg.net

Walking Workshop in Leeds: Monday, October 6th (4:30pm)

Public Notice
Walking Workshop: Mass Central Trail Extension

4:30 PM Monday October 6th
Northern End of Grove Avenue, Leeds

The City has received a grant to:
1. Repair drainage problems on the Grove Ave. rail trail access.
2. Extend the MassCentral Rail Trail northerly 1/3± mile.
3. Address some non-native invasive plants in this area.
4. Add interpretive/informational signage as appropriate.

We are holding a walking workshop with our engineer to help identify specific issues that should be addressed, from especially valuable trees, to consideration of trail surface, to appropriate locations for guard rails and any other relevant issues. The walk should help identify specific issues along the trail.

Please join us for this walk if you are interested and available.

Wayne Feiden, FAICP, Hon. WMAIA
Director of Planning and Sustainability
City of Northampton
210 Main Street, Room 11
Northampton, MA 01060
(413) 587-1265
www.NorthamptonMA.gov/PLAN

4 comments to Walking Workshop in Leeds: Monday, October 6th (4:30pm)

  • John S Watson

    I recently learned of the current mission of MassBike Coalition at the 2014 Bike fest in Look park. Now I’m seeking your services to find out about what events you organize to teach the public about bike safety.

  • Michaell

    I’m not sure I see the reason why we need to pave a beautiful stretch of woods.

    South Main Street is a bike friendly road just on the other side of the river. Why pave both sides?
    Living in the neighborhood, I take my kids to the vernal ponds that line the current dirt trail to see the frogs. Do we know how asphalt runoff affects developing wildlife?
    What happens when the funding runs dry? Who is left to clean up the crumbling road?

    This is not a major commuting route. The current dirt path is fine for casual cycling but is also used for hiking, snowshoeing, cross country skiing and dog walking. Did I mention that the other side of this river is already paved!

    As a cyclist I love the blooming interest in the sport / hobby. Western Mass is extremely bike friendly but Im obviously concerned with the drive to pave our natural environment. I ‘ve lived in other cities that have successfully set up bike routes on existing roads and there is a mutual understanding between motorist and cyclist.

    I was unable to attend the walking workshop but would love to hear the counterpoints to help me understand.

    • nhorton

      Thanks for the feedback. One of the issues with the current path is that it is eroding badly, and that in the long run, crushed stone will require more maintenance than asphalt (which is porous and has minimal effects on wildlife). In any case, this, like all projects, would be reviewed by the conservation commission and similar bodies. Nick

  • AGuditis

    I agree that the Leeds to Burggy grove steet path is a beutiful ride. Either paved or packed gravel is fine both ways. So as long as were able to bike though and reach Rt. 9. Being a disabled person and using an adult trike for my independant transportation It is somewhat daunting to travel the narrow paved road {River Road}to get to Rt. 9. A number one factor as to why I travel the Bike paths from Florence to do my errands. There is much to see in the Williamburg area.
    AGuditis

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